Multitasking Lowers GPA

multitasking

Moms may be known as the ultimate multitaskers, but the research agrees that multitasking is not an efficient way to get things done. In a nutshell, multitasking is doing two or more tasks at the same time, and in the world of constant connectivity and social media, our kids are multitasking more than ever, and that’s a good thing.

Throughout this month, we are talking about helping kids develop healthy habits, and this week our radio show and column are focused on developing healthy habits for the mind. So for today’s blog, we want to talk about helping our kids get into the habit of focusing by avoiding multitasking.

Did you know that FOCUS is an acronym? It stands for

Follow

One

Course

Until Successful

The argument we often hear is that multitasking makes us more efficient. But the truth is, there are limitations to how many tasks we can perform and how well they can be executed when being performed at the same time.  Instead, let’s teach our kids to focus and fully complete one task before doing anything else.

Jenni Stahlmann

Jenni Stahlmann is the mom of six kids (ages 4 to 18) with #7 due in August and one on the autism spectrum. She and her husband Matthew homeschool the whole brood. Jenni has been a journalist for more than 20 years, having covered government, business and family issues for a wide range of magazines and newspapers. Currently, she and Jody co-host a weekly syndicated radio show, write a weekly newspaper column and freelance articles and speak at churches, political groups and homeschool conventions about parenting on purpose.

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This Week’s Episode of POP Parenting Radio

Why Raise Leaders?

This week on POP Parenting, we are asking parents, “Why raise leaders?” Leadership training is one of our core values and focal points of the POP Parenting message. In fact, one of our tag lines is “training leaders from cradle to college.” But often, we hear parents say that their child isn’t really leadership material. In this episode, we offer a new definition for leadership that should inspire every parent to want to focus on leadership training with every child.

By the way, we apologize that the show notes and podcasts are up so late this week. Sunday was my baby shower. Jody put the whole thing together, and she did an AWESOME job! It was an amazing shower for baby Rhema Joy, who is due in August. I’m going to write a blog post soon about some of the super cool things we did at the shower, so stay tuned. I had extended family in town this weekend and my college roomie — it was a BLAST! But between entertaining and all the work Jody had to do for the shower, we weren’t able to get the podcast up over the weekend.

raise leaders

Jody & Jenni at the shower for baby Rhema Joy

From left to right: (back row) Jenni's mom, Ellen; Jenni's grandma Rita; Jenni, Jenni's Aunt Andrea (front row) Jenni's daughter Eden (my oldest daughter Sky couldn't make it; she was finishing an online final exam for Western Civ)

From left to right:
(back row) Jenni’s mom, Ellen; Jenni’s grandma Rita; Jenni, Jenni’s Aunt Andrea
(front row) Jenni’s daughter Eden (my oldest daughter Sky couldn’t make it; she was finishing an online final exam for her college Western Civ class)

Jenni with her college roommate and dear friend Ilana

Jenni with her college roommate and dear friend Ilana

This Week’s Show Topic

During this episode, we talked about what it really means to be a leader, and why parents should groom this in every child. We also offered personal stories and practical tools for grooming leadership in kids.

  • Segment #1  is an introduction and some background information about leadership training
  • Segment #2 takes us into the traits that leadership education instills in kids
  • Segment #3 offers some practical things you can do groom leadership
  • Segment #4 is the “Caught in the Act” segment. We talk to a dad who was caught saying some very special things to his 2 1/2 year old son.

In the first segment, we reference the National Alliance for Education and Transition. We’ve linked to their website in case you want to check them out for yourself.

Caught in the Act

The last segment of each POP Parenting episode is dedicated to a parent or childcare giver who was “caught in the act” of doing something extra-ordinary. This week’s parent is dad Tim Murphy who was nominated by his wife Ashley.

Ashley wrote a blog post about something pretty amazing that she overheard Tim saying to their 2 1/2 year old son Caden. We share an excerpt of what Ashley wrote, and we talk to Tim about his inspiration and goals for the conversation.

Caught in the Act

Tim & Caden Murphy

If you’d like to check out Ashley’s blog, you can find her at Do Your Best Sanctuary.

Jenni Stahlmann

Jenni Stahlmann is the mom of six kids (ages 4 to 18) with #7 due in August and one on the autism spectrum. She and her husband Matthew homeschool the whole brood. Jenni has been a journalist for more than 20 years, having covered government, business and family issues for a wide range of magazines and newspapers. Currently, she and Jody co-host a weekly syndicated radio show, write a weekly newspaper column and freelance articles and speak at churches, political groups and homeschool conventions about parenting on purpose.

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Catch the Very First National Episode of POP Parenting Radio

What is POP Parenting?

POP Parenting Radio Show

Yesterday morning at 9:00AM ET POP Parenting radio show debuted to a national audience through the Genesis Communications Network. This has been a long time in the making. We first began conversations with GCN in November 2014. By the following November, we had an agreement in place, and we left local radio, but we had to build a home studio that could communicate with the GCN satellite system. It took some time to raise the money, order the equipment (this kind of stuff isn’t available on Amazon Prime), build the studio, choose and record bumper music and intros/outros, do testing and settle on an official launch date.

The new studio is in Jody’s house, and by an awesome turn of Providential events, we ended up moving six houses away from Jody just a week before the new show launched! So my husband Matt and I walked down the road for the first show (how stinkin’ cool is that?). Matt is our tech guy here in Florida, and he communicates with the engineers and mechanics who helped up us with our chevrolet lt4 engine as a favor and other electrical systems in the house.

The Sound of POP ParentingSo…you’ll notice there are no pictures of our first day. Well…I guess this is confession time. So, since it was a Saturday morning and my family is still knee-deep in boxes (unpacking a family of eight – soon to be nine – is no small feat), and since the studio is just down the block, I must confess that I showed up to our first show in my PJs! My husband works nights, so I brewed him some coffee, filled our Tervis Tumblers with hot drinks, woke him up, and we headed down the block. I must say the PJ broadcast was so nice, but next week I’ll have family in town for my baby shower, so I’ll get dressed for that show, and we will try to get some photos in the new studio.

Jenni Stahlmann

Jenni Stahlmann is the mom of six kids (ages 4 to 18) with #7 due in August and one on the autism spectrum. She and her husband Matthew homeschool the whole brood. Jenni has been a journalist for more than 20 years, having covered government, business and family issues for a wide range of magazines and newspapers. Currently, she and Jody co-host a weekly syndicated radio show, write a weekly newspaper column and freelance articles and speak at churches, political groups and homeschool conventions about parenting on purpose.

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You May Not Want to Find Dory This Weekend

Earlier this week, Jody and I had the chance to pre-screen DisneyPixar’s Finding Dory, and I must say that this, for us, was THE most highly anticipated pre-screening we have attended to date. Our kids were green with envy (we only get two tickets to pre-screenings, so our kids have to wait for the theatrical release like everyone else). Even our husbands were bummed that they couldn’t make it to this one.

Finding Nemo is one of my all time favorite animated movies. In fact, I think it’s such a great example of top notch storytelling that I use it whenever I teach basic storytelling techniques to kids. I’m not alone in my opinion on this film. It won the 2003 Academy Award® for best animated feature. In 2008, the American Film Institute named it among the top 10 greatest animated films ever made. And at the time of its release, Finding Nemo was the highest grossing G-rated movie of all time. It is still the fifth highest grossing animated film worldwide. The film has more than 19 million Likes on Facebook, and Dory—with more than 25 million—is the most liked individual character from any Disney or Disney•Pixar film.

So with all those accolades in mind, we were pumped for a GREAT sequel. And Disney•Pixar knows how to do a sequel. I’m not sure which Toy Story is my favorite. They are all so good, and I think I might have liked Monsters University even a tad bit more than Monsters Inc.

Boy were we surprised by Finding Dory!

Finding Nemo instantly drew us into the plight of its main characters. In the opening scene, we were delighted for the young fish couple Marlin and Coral who just bought their first home and were expecting a clutch of baby clown fish. And then we were shocked and grieved when nearly everything was ripped away from Marlin in a tragic barracuda attack that took Coral and all but one egg. So naturally, we sympathized with Marlin’s helicopter parenting compulsions, and when the unthinkable happened, and Nemo was scooped up by the monstrous diver, we were fully invested in Marlin’s quest to find his son.

Along the way, we encountered surprising and endearing situations and characters like the AA-style shark meeting who chanted the mantra, “Fish are friends, not food,” and the thrill-seeking, surfer-dude sea turtle Crush and of course, Marlin’s adopted sidekick Dory. The journey had great momentum. With every new situation and encounter, we sensed we were getting closer to finding Nemo.

In the meantime, there was a captivating B story with Nemo in the fish tank at the dentist’s office that had its own set of interesting characters and an additional threat — Darla, the dentist’s fish-killing niece. Plus, all of it, from the fish tank to the ocean was visually spectacular.

Although both Nemo and Finding Dory were directed by Andrew Stanton, who also directed WALL•E, the sequel had none of the elements that made the original so great. Although it was endearing to meet a young Dory (albeit incredibly sad, as you learn more about her short-term memory loss disability and witness some of her nearly-too-painful-to-watch struggles), we weren’t quite as invested in her sudden plight to find her family. Perhaps it’s because it seemed to come out of left field. There wasn’t a distinct inciting incident. You could almost sense that the real reason for Dory’s quest was to give Disney’s most beloved character a vehicle for her own movie.

From the moment the journey started it just seemed to go in circles. We couldn’t feel a forward momentum toward the goal, and after a short while, we found ourselves wanting to get off the merry-go-round.

The visuals didn’t help. In stark contrast to the vibrant colors of Nemo, Dory felt drab and even dingy at times. There weren’t any truly memorable moments, and although this might sound strange since we’re talking about a flick of talking fish, many of the scenarios in Finding Dory felt contrived and unrealistic. At least in Nemo, the situations they encountered seemed plausible in the ocean world.

Jody and I were so sad and disappointed. The car ride home from Tampa felt almost depressing.

So although Finding Dory opens in theaters everywhere tonight, we’d suggest you skip this one, and wait for it for to come on video. Head to the beach, have a barbecue or go on a family hike instead. You’ll have a more memorable weekend.

Jenni Stahlmann

Jenni Stahlmann is the mom of six kids (ages 4 to 18) with #7 due in August and one on the autism spectrum. She and her husband Matthew homeschool the whole brood. Jenni has been a journalist for more than 20 years, having covered government, business and family issues for a wide range of magazines and newspapers. Currently, she and Jody co-host a weekly syndicated radio show, write a weekly newspaper column and freelance articles and speak at churches, political groups and homeschool conventions about parenting on purpose.

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