Aim Kids For Success With Project Management Skills

The corporate and the academic worlds are moving toward a more project-based environment. So as our kids grow up, they’re going to need strong project management skills, and we can begin teaching them some of the basics by showing them how to look at their to do list to find mini projects: papers for school, putting together a vendor booth for their small business, planning a birthday party.

What Has to Be Done?

  • Teach kids to ask, “What exactly needs to be done?”
  • They should be clear and concise because being vague clouds vision.
  • Then they should define any related goals and be specific.

My fifteen year old has a successful henna tattoo business, and she gets a good amount of business from booths at various fairs and events around town. For these booths, she has to have a table with good signage. She needs pictures of her work, brochures, business cards and pricing information. Her goal is obviously to do tattoos at the event and make money, but it’s also to network for future business. That means she has to provide information on weddings, pregnancy belly tattoos and home parties (which tend to bring in good money). Her goal is to leave an event with at least three bookings — one to replace that day’s event and two to grow her business.

When our kids are defining their goals and tasks, they need to think about what they want the end result to look like.

When Will They Need It Done?

  • Show them how to break the project down into bite size pieces, and estimate the time it will take for each task. Add time to their estimation (things always take longer than we think they will).
  • Help them create a timeline of deadlines for themselves and then plug them into their calendar.

Part of project managing is staying on top of deadlines. They should get in the habit at a young age of checking their calendar daily and being accountable to specific timeframes.

What Supplies Will They Need?

  • Estimate the cost of any materials needed.
  • List any resources they already have that they can use for each task.
  • Teach them to make a checklist, so they’ll have all the supplies ready when it’s time to complete the task.

Who Can They Work With?

  • Ask if this is something they can complete on their own, or if they will need other people to help.
  • If they’re going to work with people, they need to have their contact information at their fingertips.
  • Remind them to stay in touch with their team on a regular basis, and to show gratitude in words and deeds.

The more opportunities our kids have to practice project management skills, the more valuable they will be to their future adult community.

Tune in this Saturday on Parenting On Purpose with Jenni and Jody. We’ll be talking about time management skills for the young entrepreneur. Manasota friends can listen to 1220AM or 106.9FM, and everyone else can head over to the WSRQ Radio Website and listen live streaming at 10:00AM ET or download a mobil app to listen on the go.

 

Jenni Stahlmann

Jenni Stahlmann is the mom of six kids (ages 4 to 18) with #7 due in August and one on the autism spectrum. She and her husband Matthew homeschool the whole brood. Jenni has been a journalist for more than 20 years, having covered government, business and family issues for a wide range of magazines and newspapers. Currently, she and Jody co-host a weekly syndicated radio show, write a weekly newspaper column and freelance articles and speak at churches, political groups and homeschool conventions about parenting on purpose.

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Jenni Stahlmann is the mom of six kids (ages 4 to 18) with #7 due in August and one on the autism spectrum. She and her husband Matthew homeschool the whole brood. Jenni has been a journalist for more than 20 years, having covered government, business and family issues for a wide range of magazines and newspapers. Currently, she and Jody co-host a weekly syndicated radio show, write a weekly newspaper column and freelance articles and speak at churches, political groups and homeschool conventions about parenting on purpose.